Lipid Signature May Flag Schizophrenia

A specific lipid profile can identify patients with schizophrenia, possibly paving the way for the development of the first clinically useful diagnostic test for a severe psychiatric illness, new research suggests. Although such a test remains a long way off, the investigators said, the identification of the unique lipid signature is a critical first step. … Read more

‘Concerning’ Uptick in Pediatric Antipsychotic Prescribing

There has been a substantial increase over the last 20 years in antipsychotic prescribing among children and adolescents in England — especially among those with autism, an analysis of primary care records from 7.2 million children and adolescents aged 3-18 years shows. “This study demonstrates a trend concerning antipsychotic prescribing in children and adolescents,” study … Read more

Antipsychotic Use in Pregnancy: New Data

New data suggests that in general, antipsychotics are not associated with any increased risk of congenital malformations in a growing fetus, new data show. Dr Krista Huybrechts Overall, the findings suggest that antipsychotics are “not major teratogens and are therefore generally reassuring for women who require treatment with antipsychotics during pregnancy,” study investigator Krista Huybrechts, … Read more

Dopamine Dysregulation a Causative Culprit in Schizophrenia?

A genetic postmortem analysis of the brains of patients with schizophrenia suggests a dysfunction of dopamine receptors in the caudate nucleus may cause the disorder. Investigators have identified a mechanism on the dopamine receptor, known as the autoreceptor, which regulates how much dopamine is released from the presynaptic neuron. Impairment of this autoreceptor leads to … Read more

Menopause an Independent Risk Factor for Schizophrenia Relapse?

Menopause appears to be an independent risk factor for relapse in women with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs), new research suggests. Investigators studied a cohort of close to 62,000 people with SSDs, stratifying individuals by sex and age, and found that starting between the ages of 45 and 50 years — when the menopausal transition is … Read more

‘Amazing’ Phase 3 Results for Novel Schizophrenia Combo Drug

VIENNA — The investigational agent xanomeline-trospium (KarXT, Karuna Therapeutics) achieves significant and clinically meaningful improvements in schizophrenia symptom scores without causing problematic adverse effects, new research suggests. Results from the phase 3 EMERGENT-2 trial, which included more than 250 patients with schizophrenia, showed that those who received xanomeline-trospium for 5 weeks achieved a significant reduction … Read more

Schizophrenia, Postmodernism: A Philosophical Treatment Exercise

Schizophrenia is defined as having episodes of psychosis: periods of time when one suffers from delusions, hallucinations, disorganized behaviors, disorganized speech, and negative symptoms. The concept of schizophrenia can be simplified as a detachment from reality. Patients who struggle with this illness frame their perceptions with a different set of rules and beliefs than the … Read more

Baseline Neuromotor Abnormalities Persist in Schizophrenia

Baseline dyskinesia and neurological soft signs (NSS) predicted the disease process of schizophrenia over a 21-year follow-up period, based on data from 243 adult patients. Neuromotor abnormalities in psychotic disorders have long been ignored as side effects of antipsychotic drugs, but they are gaining new attention as a component of the disease process, with implications … Read more

Clozapine Best Choice for Reducing SUD Risk in Schizophrenia?

Clozapine or antipsychotic polytherapy appear to be the best approach in reducing the risk for a substance use disorder (SUD) in adults with schizophrenia and for preventing relapse in patients with both diagnoses, results of a real-world study show. “Our findings are in line with a recent meta-analysis showing superior efficacy of clozapine in schizophrenia … Read more

LAIAs More Effective Than Oral Antipsychotics for Schizophrenia

For patients with schizophrenia, long-acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIAs) are associated with a lower risk than oral antipsychotics (OAs) for disease relapse and hospitalization ― and they carry no increased risk for adverse events, new research shows. Investigators analyzed data for more than 70,000 patients with schizophrenia and found that, compared with OAs, LAIAs were associated … Read more