Stable, Long-term Opioid Therapy Safer Than Tapering?

Discontinuing Stable, Long-TERM OPIOIID Therapy May Not BE NECESAY FOR PATIENTS who show no Signs of Misuse ― and IT COUL Even Be Safer Than Tapering Or Aburt Discontinism, New Research Suggests. Investigators Analyzed Data for Almost 200,000 Patients who did not have signs of OPIOOID USE DISEORDER (Oud) and Were Receiving Opioid Treatment. The … Read more

Time to Stop Using Benzodiazepines for Vertigo?

Antihistamines are superior to benzodiazepines for the immediate treatment of vertigo, results of a new systematic review and meta-analysis suggest. But antihistamines and benzodiazepines are no better than other medications for the acute treatment of vertigo, nor for treatment at 1 week or 1 month, the analysis showed. Dr. Benton Hunter Given that the study … Read more

Best Meds for Insomnia Identified?

Two drugs have emerged as the optimal medications for treating insomnia based on the “best-available evidence,” but there are caveats. In a comprehensive comparative-effectiveness analysis, lemborexant and eszopiclone showed the best efficacy, acceptability, and tolerability for acute and long-term insomnia treatment. However, eszopiclone may cause substantial side effects — and safety data on lemborexant were … Read more

The Struggle of Treating Executive Dysfunction

Maybe you know some of these patients: they may come late or not show up at all. They may have little to say and minimize their difficulties, often because they are ashamed of how much effort it takes to meet ordinary obligations. They may struggle to complete assignments, fail classes, or lose jobs. And being … Read more

Docs Check Mail for Ways to Return — and Ruin — Extra Opioids

Mail carriers could play a key role in reducing opioid misuse, according to researchers and regulators. One strategy under consideration by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) would require that opioid analgesics be dispensed with prepaid mail-back envelopes so patients can return leftover medication. Another approach — which is not part of the FDA … Read more

Has the Anti-Benzodiazepine Backlash Gone Too Far?

When benzodiazepines were first introduced, they were greeted with enthusiasm. Librium came first, in 1960, followed by Valium in 1962, and they were seen as an improvement over barbiturates for the treatment of anxiety, insomnia, and seizures. From 1968 to 1982, Valium (diazepam) was the No. 1-selling US pharmaceutical: 2.3 billion tablets of Valium were … Read more