Advance Directives for Psych Care Reduce Compulsory Admissions

Providing peer or community health workers to help psychiatric patients with complete psychiatric advance directives (PAD) to govern care in advance of a mental health crisis is associated with a significant reduction in compulsory hospital admissions, new research shows. Results of a randomized trial showed the peer worker PAD group had a 42% reduction in … Read more

Unique Primary Care Model Effective for Comorbid Depression, PTSD

A unique primary care program successfully manages patients with depression and comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and, if widely implemented may result in more rapid treatment and help alleviate wait times for specialty psychiatric care. Zachary Zuschlag, MD “We know there are strains on the mental healthcare system, and sometimes something as simple as getting … Read more

Death Risk Spikes With New Onset-Depression After RA Diagnosis

The development of depression after a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis increased the risk for death “more than sixfold” when compared with having no depression at diagnosis, according to Danish researchers. Cumulative mortality at 10 years was approximately 37% in patients with comorbid RA and depression versus around 13.5% of RA patients with no depression, Jens Kristian … Read more

ECT Tied to Reduction in All-Cause Mortality in Major Depression

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) may lower mortality for patients with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD), new research suggests. In an analysis of data from a large database of inpatients across the United States, use of ECT for those with resistant MDD was associated with significantly lower in-hospital mortality compared with those who did not receive ECT. … Read more

Specialties Differ on Value, Utilization of Telehealth: Study

Attitudes toward the use of telehealth differ markedly among mental health, primary care, and specialty care clinicians, according to a study published June 7 in JAMA Network Open. The study involved eight clinics of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) New England Healthcare System. Mental health professionals used telehealth — including phone and video visits … Read more

Social Activities May Offset Psychosis Risk in Poor Communities

Social engagement such as participation in community or school-based activities may mitigate psychosis risk in susceptible youth living in disadvantaged communities, new research suggests. A study of more than 170 young participants showed reduced hippocampal volume in those living in poor neighborhoods who had low social engagement vs their peers with greater community engagement. Dr. … Read more

FDA Denies Petition to Disqualify Researchers Over Controversial Ketamine Studies

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has declined to take further action against a group of investigators at Hennepin County Medical Center/Hennepin Healthcare (HCMC), who conducted controversial studies involving ketamine and other sedatives in agitated persons without their consent. A citizen filed by Public Citizen, a consumer advocacy group, had asked the FDA to … Read more

At-Home Vagus Nerve Stimulation Promising for Postpartum Depression

At-home, noninvasive auricular vagus nerve stimulation (aVNS) therapy is well-tolerated and associated with a significant reduction in postpartum depressive and anxiety symptoms, new research suggests. In a small proof-of-concept pilot study of 25 women with postpartum depression receiving 6 weeks of daily aVNS treatment, results showed that 74% achieved response and 61% achieved remission, as … Read more

CDC Says About 20% Get Long COVID. New Models Try Define It

As the number of people persistent, and sometimes debilitating, symptoms from COVID-19 increases, researchers have struggled to pinpoint exactly how common so-called “long COVID” is, as well as how to clearly define exactly who has it or who is likely to get it. Now, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) researchers have concluded that … Read more

Abortion Debate May Affect Rx Decisions for Pregnant Women

Obstetrician Beverly Gray, MD, is already seeing the effects of the Roe v. Wade abortion debate in her North Carolina practice. Dr Beverly Gray The state allows abortion but requires that women get counseling with a qualified health professional 72 hours before the procedure. “Aside from that, we still have patients asking for more efficacious … Read more