Heart Failure Drug a New Treatment Option for Alcoholism?

Spironolactone, a potassium-sparing diuretic typically used to treat heart failure and hypertension, shows promise in treating alcohol use disorder (AUD), new research suggests. Researchers at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), and Yale University School of Medicine investigated the impact of spironolactone on AUD. Initially, … Read more

First Known Opiate Biomarker Shows Fentanyl’s Effect on Brain

Fentanyl depresses breathing about 4 minutes before symptoms of distress are evident at a dose that is 1700 times lower than that needed for sedation, new research shows. This new information comes after researchers identified a unique EEG signature produced by fentanyl, the first known biomarker of an opiate’s effect on the brain. By monitoring … Read more

Study Provides New Data on Isotretinoin and Psychiatric Effects

The use of isotretinoin to treat acne was not associated with an increase in adverse neuropsychiatric outcomes, compared with the use of oral antibiotics, in a large retrospective cohort study published in the British Journal of Dermatology. Although severe neuropsychiatric effects associated with isotretinoin therapy in patients with acne have been reported, “the evidence base…is … Read more

Disparities Shrink With Aggressive Depression Screening

An analysis at a large academic health system suggests that universal screening might help to reduce problematic disparities in depression treatment. The study began soon after the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended depression screening for all adults in 2016. The task force based this recommendation on evidence that people who are screened and treated … Read more

Why I Left Pharma — After ‘Leaving’ Academia for Pharma

Why don’t we have better psychiatric drugs? After a few years in the pharmaceutical industry, I think I finally understand why. Four years ago, I left full-time academic employment to take full-time research employment at a pharmaceutical company. I wrote a commentary about it for Medscape soon thereafter titled “How Academia Left Me.” Now it’s … Read more

When Sharing Sensitive Info, Patients Prefer App vs Staff: Study

Patients using a tablet-based app were more than twice as likely to disclose depression, intimate partner violence, and fall risk compared with verbal screenings, according to a new study. The study, published online today in JAMA Network Openincludes the use of mPath, a tablet-based app created by a team of researchers at Wake Forest School … Read more