Self-Management App May Reduce Bipolar Depression, Boost QoL

A smartphone-based self-management intervention developed for patients with bipolar disorder (BD) can help decrease depressive symptoms and improve quality of life, new research suggests. In a randomized clinical trial of usual care plus the experimental smartphone-based intervention known as LiveWell vs usual care alone, participants in the smartphone group who were categorized as low-risk or … Read more

Improving Sleep Boosts Cognition in Refractory Epilepsy

NASHVILLE, Tennessee ― Targeting relevant sleep problems for patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) improves cognition, results of a new, double-blind, randomized controlled trial suggested. Study findings show significant improvement in REM sleep and language scores for patients with TLE who took the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil and better slow-wave sleep and memory scores for … Read more

Struggling to Focus? Try Video Games

And that wasn’t all. The people in the study also improved their thinking skills in areas that weren’t targeted: sustained attention and working memory. It was the first evidence of the potential for therapeutic video games to target and enhance those abilities. But it wouldn’t be the last. Which brings us back to kids with … Read more

Recommending Exercise for Migraine: Just Do It

Strength training is the most effective form of exercise for reducing migraine, with high-intensity aerobics coming in second, and both beating top-line migraine medications topiramate and amitriptyline, new research suggests. The new results should encourage clinicians to recommend patients with migraine engage in strength-training exercise whenever possible, study author Yohannes W. Woldeamanuel, MD, a physician-scientist … Read more

Novel Smartphone App Helps Reduce Fear of Cancer Recurrence

A novel “smartphone psychotherapy” application has been shown to relieve some of the anxiety and fear about cancer recurrence (FCR) that often causes distress to cancer survivors. The intervention is comprised of smartphone problem-solving therapy and behavioral activation apps, and was tested in a study that involved 447 survivors of breast cancer. The results showed … Read more

Why We Just Can’t Look Away

Halloween Ends? Yeah, sure. Like that’ll happen. The market for horror remains robust 44 years after the original Halloween movie premiered. Part of the reason (besides Michael Myers’s charm) is that we humans appear to be hard-wired to enjoy getting scared. Whatever happens in Halloween Ends, the latest entry in the long-running film series, you’ll … Read more

1 in 7 Mortality Postsurgery; ECT and MDE; and Monkeypox News

One in Seven Older Adults Die Within 1 Year After Surgery One in seven older adults die within 1 year of major surgery. The risk for mortality is higher among people older than 80 years or who are frail or may have dementia, according to a new study of community-living individuals. The study did not … Read more

ECT Tops Ketamine for Major Depression

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is more effective than intravenous (IV) ketamine for patients experiencing a major depressive episode (MDE) in new findings that are in line with the KetECT study ― the first head-to-head trial of ketamine and ECT. As reported by Medscape Medical News, the KetECT trial was published earlier this year. It showed that … Read more

MDD Tied to Childhood Trauma Is Treatable

Despite a higher symptom burden, patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and a history of childhood trauma (CT) can achieve significant recovery following treatment with a combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, new research suggests. Results from a meta-analysis of 29 studies from 1966 to 2019, which included almost 7000 adults with MDD, showed that more … Read more

Visual Impairment More Common in Minority Youth

Race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status are closely associated with visual impairments in adolescents in the United States, researchers have found. The study showed that adolescents who identified as Black, Mexican-American, of low-income, or as non-US citizens were two to three times more likely than White adolescents to report vision problems and to perform worse on … Read more