First Known Opiate Biomarker Shows Fentanyl’s Effect on Brain

Fentanyl depresses breathing about 4 minutes before symptoms of distress are evident at a dose that is 1700 times lower than that needed for sedation, new research shows. This new information comes after researchers identified a unique EEG signature produced by fentanyl, the first known biomarker of an opiate’s effect on the brain. By monitoring … Read more

Toward a New Open-Door Model for Psychiatric Wards

If isolated, patients with mental disorders may end up having higher levels of social impairment. This has led several hospitals in Spain to set up open-door departments that are more accessible. The purpose of the open-door model is to help remove the stigma from individuals who need to be admitted to a psychiatric ward because … Read more

Ketamine Linked to Reduced Suicidal Thoughts, Depression, Anxiety

Ketamine infusions can help reduce symptoms of suicidal ideation, depression, and anxiety in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD), new research suggests. Results from a retrospective chart review analysis, which included more than 400 participants with TRD, illustrated that ketamine is a safe and rapid treatment in a real-world patient population, lead author Patrick A. Oliver, … Read more

Borderline Personality Disorder Raises MDD Relapse Risk After ECT

Borderline personality disorder was significantly associated with relapse after 6 months in adults with major depressive disorder who underwent electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), based on data from 109 individuals. Dr Matthieu Hein ECT has demonstrated effectiveness for treatment of unipolar and bipolar major depression, but relapses within 6 months are frequent, and potential factors affecting relapse … Read more

LAIAs More Effective Than Oral Antipsychotics for Schizophrenia

For patients with schizophrenia, long-acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIAs) are associated with a lower risk than oral antipsychotics (OAs) for disease relapse and hospitalization ― and they carry no increased risk for adverse events, new research shows. Investigators analyzed data for more than 70,000 patients with schizophrenia and found that, compared with OAs, LAIAs were associated … Read more

Dermatologists Want Training in Antipsychotic Prescribing for DI

GLASGOW — Dermatologists do not feel confident in independently prescribing antipsychotic medications for patients with delusional infestation, shows a UK survey that also indicated there is a clear demand for training in prescribing these drugs. Delusional infestation is a rare disorder characterized by an individual’s belief that his or her skin, body, or immediate environment … Read more

Canada Funds Projects to Address PTSD in Healthcare Workers

Two McMaster University researchers working on projects that address pandemic-associated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among healthcare workers have received more than $4.5 million in Canadian federal funding. The projects include a website with evidence-based resources and a smartphone app that encourages early intervention and peer support. Together, the projects are expected to reach more than … Read more

Why Empathy Is More Helpful Than Sympathy for My Patients

Growing up, I never felt comforted when someone expressed their sympathy to me when I was in a difficult situation. And I have never been good at expressing sympathy for others. When we feel sympathy for someone, we feel pity or sorrow for their situation. But we don’t understand what it is like to be … Read more

COVID-Induced Anxiety in Physicians: How Did I Cope?

When the pandemic hit the world, I was working as a psychiatry consultant at a hospital. With the lockdown, much of the hospital seemed deserted. In the doctor’s parking lot, where it was normally hard to find a spot, only a few cars were parked. Once busy corridors were nearly empty. So was the doctors’ … Read more

Death Risk Spikes With New Onset-Depression After RA Diagnosis

The development of depression after a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis increased the risk for death “more than sixfold” when compared with having no depression at diagnosis, according to Danish researchers. Cumulative mortality at 10 years was approximately 37% in patients with comorbid RA and depression versus around 13.5% of RA patients with no depression, Jens Kristian … Read more