Medical Student Well-Being During the COVID-19 Pandemic

During the initial stage of the COVID-19 pandemic US medical students were suspended from in-person clinical interaction. This decision was based on specific guidance from the Association of American Medical Colleges and subsequently implemented in medical schools across the United States.1 Our research project addressed students’ stress level before and after clinical in-person suspension and … Read more

One in Four Cardiologists Report Mental Health Issues

More than a quarter of cardiologists in an international survey reported experiencing mental health conditions ranging from anxiety or anger issues to major depression or other psychiatric disorders. Such conditions varied in prevalence by cardiology subspecialty and years in the field, were more common in women than in men, and were closely linked to enduring … Read more

Problematic Alcohol Use on the Rise Among Physicians?

Problematic alcohol use by physicians appears to be increasing, new research shows. However, good data on exactly how common this is and on salient risk factors are lacking, investigators note. In a systematic literature review, investigators found the prevalence of self-reported problematic alcohol use varied widely, but could affect up to one third of physicians. … Read more

Do Buddhist Teachings Protect Against Depression?

Following five key Buddhist teachings may help protect against depression, new research shows. A study from Thailand showed that among people who observed what are known as the Five Precepts of Buddhism ― not to kill, steal, engage in sexual misconduct, tell ill-intentioned lies, or use intoxicants ― rates of depressive symptoms were significantly lower … Read more

Stanford President Under Investigation for Alleged Misconduct

Dr. Marc Tessier-Lavigne Stanford University has launched a formal investigation into its own president, neuroscientist Marc Tessier-Lavigne, PhD, for alleged research misconduct pertaining to five scientific articles on which he was lead or coauthor. Stanford’s Board of Trustees is leading the investigation. The university’s student newspaper, the Stanford Dailybroke the news of the investigation on … Read more

Pioneering Addiction Psychiatrist Mitchell Rosenthal Dead at 87

Dr. Mitchell Rosenthal Mitchell Rosenthal, MD, the founder and long-time president and CEO of Phoenix House, a nonprofit substance use disorder treatment organization, died on November 17 at the age of 87. The psychiatrist died at a Manhattan hospital from complications of pneumonia, The New York Times reports. Rosenthal was a dedicated advocate of ensuring … Read more

From Frankenstein to Lecter: Hollywood’s Baddest Docs

Masks can be scary on Halloween, but more so when they come with scrubs, scalpels, and God complexes. In March, Medscape readers chose their favorite characters and performers in the Hollywood healthcare system. As a Halloween treat, we follow up with a dozen of our favorite Evil Doctors from a deep bench (and no, Dr … Read more

Four Methods to Chip Away at Imposter Syndrome

Regardless of the setting, one of the most frequently discussed topics in healthcare is imposter syndrome. Imposter syndrome was first defined by Clance and Imes as an inability to internalize success, and the tendency to attribute success to external causes such as luck, error, or knowing the appropriate individual. This definition is essential because most … Read more

Doctors Less Open to New Patients With Opioid Use Disorder

Family physicians are almost three times less likely to offer a new patient appointment to a patient with opioid use disorder (OUD), compared with a patient with diabetes, new data from Ontario, Canada suggest. In a randomized clinical trial that included almost 400 family physicians, those with more than 20 years’ experience were almost 13 … Read more

Doctors Rush to Use Supreme Court Ruling to Escape Opioid Charges

Dr. Nelson Onaro conceded last summer that he’d written prescription illegals, although he said he was thinking only of his patients. From a tiny, brick clinic in Oklahoma, he doled out hundreds of opioid pills and dozens of fentanyl patches with no legitimate medical purpose. “Those medications were prescribed to help my patients, from my … Read more