US Docs at Double the Risk of Postpartum Depression

One in four new mothers who are physicians report experiencing postpartum depression, a rate twice that of the general population, according to new survey findings presented at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) 2022 Annual Meeting. The survey results weren’t all grim. More than three fourths (78%) of new mothers reported meeting their … Read more

Is Leaving Your Current Job the Answer?

We have been dealing with the COVID pandemic since 2020. And due to that, there is a lot of discussion about related physician burnout. I had my own share of challenges with the pandemic, and for the most part I can relate to a majority of the people I interact with. I shared a similar … Read more

Adapting a Zero Suicide Approach to Native Communities

Edwina Valdo found herself on the receiving end of a desperate phone call last year on the suicide crisis line at Acoma Pueblo Behavioral Health Services in New Mexico. Valdo, whose regular job is as a grant manager, was filling in because the pandemic had left the facility short-staffed. “I did my best to keep … Read more

Burnout ‘Highly Prevalent’ in Psychiatrists Across the Globe

Burnout in psychiatrists is “highly prevalent” across the globe, new research shows. In a review and meta-analysis of 36 studies and more than 5000 psychiatrists in European countries, as well as the United States, Australia, New Zealand, India, Turkey, and Thailand, results showed that 25% of respondents met criteria for burnout, as measured by the … Read more

Higher ‘Chemical Restraint’ Rates in Black Psych Patients in the ED

Black patients presenting with psychiatric disorders to hospital emergency departments (EDs) across the US have significantly higher rates of chemical restraint than their white counterparts, new research shows. Results of a national study showed Black patients presenting to the ED were 63% more likely to receive chemical sedation than white patients. The investigators also found … Read more

The ‘Privilege’ of Unpaid Work in Academia: Friend or Foe

A job posting about an unpaid assistant adjunct professor position in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, Los Angeles caused a recent upheaval in the academic community. The position required applicants to have a PhD in chemistry or biochemistry, previous teaching experience at a university level, as well as three … Read more

Top Drug Official Wants New Approach to Abuse Crisis

When a chemical spill left 300,000 West Virginians in need of clean drinking water and a public official they could trust, Rahul Gupta, MD, MPH, was there. When the March of Dimes needed a voice to fight legislation that threatened to gut healthcare for pregnant women, Gupta was front and center. Dr Rahul Gupta, MD … Read more

Does Hustling Equate to Success?

Thank God it’s Monday? Sincerely yours, #hustle. The COVID-19 pandemic has given us the opportunity to reevaluate what we believe is important and valuable in our life. For some, it’s the opportunity to perform meaningful work; for others, it’s increased financial compensation; and, for the remaining, it may be autonomy (eg, control over their time). … Read more

How Social Drivers of Health Lead to Physician Burnout

Dr Gary Price The vast majority of US physicians regularly treat patients with socioeconomic challenges — from financial instability and a lack of transmission to eviction threats and domestic problems — but are deeply frustrated by their inability to adequately address these issues, a new survey has found. The survey, conducted in February by The … Read more

Women Have Made Strides in Medicine, but There Are Miles to Go

As a female physician, I was excited that March was recognized as International Women’s Month. Reflecting back on the day, I was happy about the strides the medical community has made in regards to including women and treating women as equals. As the only woman in my residency class, it is clear that the medical … Read more