Perceived Discrimination Tied to Worse Recovery After MI in Young

Perceived discrimination — unfair treatment due to their race, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or other factors — in day-to-day life was common in young myocardial infarction (MI) survivors and was associated with worse recovery, new research suggests. In this study, patients competed with three questionnaires assessing perceived discrimination, general mental and physical health, and angina-related … Read more

Local-Level Youth Suicides Reflect Mental Health Care Shortages

Rates of youth suicides at the county level increased as mental health professional shortages increased, based on data from more than 5,000 youth suicides across all counties in the United States. Suicide remains the second leading cause of death among adolescents in the United States, and shortages of pediatric mental health providers are well known, … Read more

Intermittent Fasting Diet Trend Linked to Disordered Eating

Intermittent fasting (IF), defined as fasting for more than eight hours at a time, is a trend that is growing in popularity. Yet new research shows it may be linked to eating disorder (ED) behaviors. Researchers from the University of Toronto analyzed data from more than 2,700 adolescents and young adults from the Canadian Study … Read more

Childhood Adversity Tied to CVD in Early Adulthood

Children who experience adversity ― including serious family illness or death, poverty, neglect, or dysfunctional and stressful family relationships ― are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in early adulthood, a large Danish study has found. Compared to young adults who experienced little adversity in childhood, peers who experienced high levels of childhood … Read more

SUD History Tied to Increased Risk of Death From Other Illnesses

Patients hospitalized for substance use disorder (SUD) are significantly more likely to die from other medical conditions later in life, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at mortality following a diagnosis of 28 different medical conditions, including heart failure, cancer, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and stroke, and found patients with a history of alcohol or drug … Read more

Chronic Pain Tied to Poor Health, Increased COVID Risk

Individuals who have chronic pain at age 44 are more likely to report poor general health, poor mental health, and joblessness when they are in their 50s and 60s, new research shows. Chronic pain at age 44 (in 2002) was also predictive of SARS-CoV-2 infection nearly two decades later, in 2021. “We speculate that pain … Read more

Mental Illness Tied to More Healthcare Use Among Homeless

Among adults experiencing homelessness in Ontario, Canada, those with a mental illness are more likely to use emergency, inpatient, and physician services, according to a new report. In general, homelessness is associated with higher healthcare needs, hospitalizations, and primary care appointments, compared with low-income control groups, the study authors wrote. At the same time, healthcare … Read more

Birdsong May Calm Anxiety, Paranoia

Listening to birdsong appears to have a positive and significant impact on mental health and mood, new research suggests. Investigators found that people who listened to recordings of birds singing experienced a significant reduction in anxiety and paranoia. In contrast, the researchers also found that recordings of traffic noises, including car engines, sirens, and construction, … Read more

Focusing on What Goes Right: The Safety-II Mindset

Amy C. Edmondson, known for her work in psychological safety and organizational behavior, squarely places healthcare organizations in the category of “complex systems.” In her article “Strategies for Learning from Failure,” she suggests that “failures are due to the inherent uncertainty of work.” The very nature of the work requires healthcare professionals to be skilled … Read more

Money Matters in Psychiatric Assessment

Despite money’s central role in our lives, many trainees — and some seasoned practitioners — skirt around financial issues. Some clinicians confess that inquiring about patients’ finances feels “too personal.” They fear that asking about money could suggest that the clinician is primarily concerned with getting paid. Some clinicians feel that looking into patients’ finances … Read more