Music Tied to Improved Mood, Less Stress During Times of Crisis

Regularly listening to music during times of crisis can significantly improve mood and relieve stress, new research suggests. In a cohort study of more than 700 adults, music listening during the COVID-19 pandemic was “prospectively associated” with lower momentary stress levels, better mood levels, and calmness–music perceived as “happy” was especially beneficial. The study corroborates … Read more

Emotional Eating Tied to Risk for Diastolic Dysfunction

Eating in response to stress — known as emotional eating — was significantly associated with several markers of long-term cardiovascular damage, based on data from 1,109 individuals. “We know diet plays a huge role in cardiovascular disease, but we’ve focused a lot of work on what you eat, not on what makes you eat” — … Read more

Brain Differences Suggest Therapeutic Targets in Takotsubo

A new study has identified differences in the brain present in patients with the cardiac disorder Takotsubo syndrome vs control scans, which may lead to new therapeutic targets. Takotsubo syndrome is an acute heart failure cardiomyopathy mimicking an acute myocardial infarction (MI) in its presentation, but on investigation, no obstructive coronary disease is present. The … Read more

Stress Tolerance Influences Suicide Risk and Can Be Modified

The study covered in this summary was published on ResearchSquare as a preprint and has not yet been peer reviewed. Key Takeaways In people with depression, the relationship between stressful life events and suicide risk is completely mediated by distress tolerance, defined as an individual’s actual or perceived ability to experience, accept, and persist in … Read more

Two Short-Term Exposure Therapies Linked to PTSD Reductions

Two forms of short-term exposure therapy may help reduce symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), new research suggests. In a randomized clinical trial comparing an abbreviated form of prolonged exposure (PE) therapy against an intensive outpatient program (IOP) form of PE, military veterans with combat-related PTSD in both groups experienced significant improvements in PTSD symptoms. … Read more

Cancer Exacts a High Emotional Toll on Spouses

A cancer diagnosis can take a heavy emotional toll on a patient’s spouse, even years after the diagnosis, as new research shows. In a study of more than 3 million Danes and Swedes, spouses of patients with cancer faced an increased risk of developing a psychiatric disorder, including substance abuse, depression, anxiety, and stress-related conditions, … Read more

Medical Student Well-Being During the COVID-19 Pandemic

During the initial stage of the COVID-19 pandemic US medical students were suspended from in-person clinical interaction. This decision was based on specific guidance from the Association of American Medical Colleges and subsequently implemented in medical schools across the United States.1 Our research project addressed students’ stress level before and after clinical in-person suspension and … Read more

Climate Change Has Consequences for Mental Health

The topic of discussion at the United Nations (UN) Climate Change Conference in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, was how the consequences of climate change may be mitigated. To date, the discussion has been focused on the environment, living conditions, and people’s physical health. However, the effects on the mind are no less dramatic, emphasizing the German … Read more

With NYC Plan for Mentally Ill, Hospitals Face Complex Task

NEW YORK (AP) — New York City’s latest plan to keep mentally ill people from languishing in public is billed as a common-sense strategy to get them help. By encouraging police officers and city medics to take more psychologically disturbing people to hospitals, even if they refuse care, Mayor Eric Adams says he’s humanely tackling … Read more

Psychosocial Stress Tied to Elevated Risk for Acute Stroke

People with high stress levels have a significantly higher risk for acute stroke than their counterparts with low stress, but the risk lessens if they feel in control of work and home life, a new study suggests. The benefit was greatest among those who believed they had more control at work, compared with those whose … Read more