Medical Student Well-Being During the COVID-19 Pandemic

During the initial stage of the COVID-19 pandemic US medical students were suspended from in-person clinical interaction. This decision was based on specific guidance from the Association of American Medical Colleges and subsequently implemented in medical schools across the United States.1 Our research project addressed students’ stress level before and after clinical in-person suspension and … Read more

Can a Mediterranean Diet Ease Depression in Young Men?

This transcript has been edited for clarity. Drew Ramsey, MD: Welcome back everyone. I’m Dr Drew Ramsey. I’m on the editorial board with Medscape Psychiatry and I’m an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Columbia University. We have a special guest today. I’m here with nutritionist Jessica Bayes, who’s at the University of Technology Sydney, … Read more

NPs Can Offset Psychiatry Shortage, Tackle Mental Health Crisis

With many psychiatrists not accepting insurance, and fewer psychiatrists billing Medicare due to reimbursement cuts, psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) are seen lately as part of the solution to the shortage of mental healthcare providers in the United States. In many states, these specialized nurse practitioners can prescribe medication, unlike psychologists and other therapists, … Read more

‘Striking’ Rate of Suicidal Thoughts in Teens With Epilepsy

NASHVILLE, Tennessee ― About 21% of teens are newly diagnosed with epilepsy experience suicidal ideation, and the percentage jumps to 31% within 3 years, new research reveals. Dr Hadley Greenwood “We hope these results inspire epileptologists and neurologists to both recognize and screen for suicide ideation and behaviors in their adolescent patients,” study investigator Hadley … Read more

Strong Two-Way Link Between Epilepsy and Depression

A large Danish study supports a robust and long-term bidirectional relationship between epilepsy and depression, with implications for diagnosis and patient care. Eva Bolling-Ladegaard The findings “strongly support previous observations of a bidirectional association between these two brain disorders,” Eva Bolling-Ladegaard, MD, PhD student, Department of Clinical Medicine (Neurology), Aarhus University, Denmark, told Medscape Medical … Read more

Four Methods to Chip Away at Imposter Syndrome

Regardless of the setting, one of the most frequently discussed topics in healthcare is imposter syndrome. Imposter syndrome was first defined by Clance and Imes as an inability to internalize success, and the tendency to attribute success to external causes such as luck, error, or knowing the appropriate individual. This definition is essential because most … Read more

Active Shooter Drills May Be Harming Children, but Doctors Offer Help

Gun attacks in classrooms across the nation have led principals and other school leaders to implement “active shooter” drills to try to increase the safety of their students and faculty. The drills can range from staging lockdowns and sheltering in place to quasi dramas with mock shooters roaming the halls. Although the goals of these … Read more

Local Public Health Efforts in Schools May Not Work

Efforts to prevent and curb substance use in schools through public health engagement (PHE) appear to be effective where use of cigarettes and cannabis is high but had the opposite impact in where use of alcohol and cannabis is low, according to a cross-sectional study published in the Canadian Journal of Public Health. The study … Read more

Police Often Called for Emergency Mental Health Transfers

University health clinics in Ontario, Canada frequently enlist law enforcement to accompany students during transfers to mental health facilities, a new study finds. Physicians fear that this practice is harmful. At some clinics, the police routinely handcuff students during the trip to the hospital. β€œThe people we interviewed were all on the same page, but … Read more

Gun Safety ‘Wrapped in a Mental Health Bill’: Health Provisions

The gun safety law forged through tense bipartisan talks in the Senate last month has been heralded as the first federal legislation in 30 years to combat rising gun violence. But what often falls below the radar is the new law’s focus on improving mental health services. News has coverage largely centered on the law’s … Read more